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, the government already provided grants to battery companies, and lastly another one went bankrupt, a 123 battery company. compact power run by lg -- battery company that is laying off workers. i'm not sure the government has a role. as far as natural gas goes, gm and chrysler have announced, gm and ford have announced they will be making dual fuel pickup trucks using natural gas and gasoline, and many fleet of trucks, and buses now run on natural gas. .. the wrong technology will be a drain of the taxpayer and will add to our trillion dollar deficit. [inaudible question] >> thank you. i would like to know, to which to greedy peak says the united nations look in that 21st century that has contributed to the conservation of political power in the hands of the green lobby? >> well, un has always been very encouraging of the green lobby, and this green jobs issue is not just an issue here in the that states but the issue also in europe, being encouraged by the u.n., meetings in real over the summer, but europe is also finding that green jobs are not all they thought there would be. spain has just st
. then lastly, i have to say that this is a story of guilty love. which i'll come back to if you ask me. what's the book really about? all right. let me give you the main points here. i'll keep it brief because the basic structure the skelton of the book is quickly told. it's a analysis. it cull man nates in a prediction. this industry, which is now at this moment, the world's largest oil producer because the saudis have tholgds back. they play tag with one another. they alternate and -- for who is the world's largest oil producer. russias at the moment are a hit. they moved up very slightly to very nearly the soviet level of production. meanwhile the saudis have battles back in order to moderate the -- as a matter of fact why are they like that? we request come back to that. so anyway, there we have the russians who are the number one oil producers. but they have essentially been coasting on the asset inherited from the soviet union from another time and another place. and such was the wealthy of what was discovered such was the wealth of what is still producing 60% of russian oil production
? how was that done? so you'll find there's a chapter on that side of the story. and then lastly, i have to say that this is a story of guilty love. [laughter] which i'll come back to if you ask me. so what's the book really about? all right. let me give you the main points here, and i'll keep this brief because the basic structure, the skeleton of the book is something that's quickly told, and it's basically an analysis that culminates in a prediction. this industry which is now at this moment the world's large oil producer because the saudis have throttled back, the saudis and the russians played tag with one another -- they alternate as to who's the world's largest oil producer. the russians at this moment are ahead. they have moved up very slightly to very nearly the soviet level of production. meanwhile, the saudis have throttled back in order to moderate the -- well, why are they, as a matter of fact? why are they throttling? we can come back to that. so anyway, you have the russians who are the number one oil producers, but they have essentially been coasting on the assets inherit
. disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. that's what i'm here for. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influenced millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world, and i think that i and all of your are products of that. it's not a joke. [applause] >> i should stick to the joke thing. all of you looked at me like, what was that about? so the book is kind of -- has been born from the reagan era. at it about people who pretend to be tolerant when in fact they're not at and all they use tolerance as a weapon to shut you up. who was the first real target? ronald reagan. what was he portrayed as in the media? what kept you talking about low taxes and free market was being described as being mean, cold, evil. the dad that never hugged you. that's the basis of all liberalism. he was the dad that never hugged you. he didn't hate the poor. he ate the poor. a consequence of this -- well, run runs have always had to deal with this and we don't really fight back. we assume that we are cold, and we don't know what to do about it except just tiply make the economy
to get him the help that they need. lastly, in addition to the first, i personally support the creation of the coalition against american violence and crime which would examine violent crime in the court recommendations on what our government can do on a local and state and national level to reduce domestic terrorism and violence crimes, such as those that we witnessed in newtown, aurora, colorado, tucson, arizona, and others. as mayor of philadelphia, i also announce something that i referred to as the sandy hook principles. these principles are a call to action for corporations to keep basic core values of american citizens in promoting the health and safety and well-being of our community. the objective of these principles is the influence of the behavior of gun manufacturers and establishing a baseline standard for responsible conduct of their businesses. i have shared these principles with many other mayors from around the country and we expect we will be reviewing and discussing them in the days ahead. let me be very clear, however. strengthening our gun laws does not have to wait
, there are over 400 specific disabilityish -- disability issues in the database. and lastly, the u.s. census will be releasing later in the year data on how many people with disabilities actually voted. it'll be broken down by category and by types of disabilities. and in the cases of the larger jurisdictions, um, there'll even be data. um, there were 14,700,000 people with disabilities who voted in 2008. that's still a 7% gap with between the disabled and able-bodied in terms of voter participation. poll worker training is, um, is extremely important. some of the problems that we saw not only in the election, but in previous election that link back to poll worker training are the machines aren't turned on. the poll workers don't know how to turn on the accessible machine. the poll workers pressure people not to use the accessible machine. poll workers quite inappropriately looking at a person with a disability and saying you're not competent to vote. this happens over and over again. that is illegal, it is morally offensive, and it happens lots of times in every election if lots of places -
sustainability and lastly, corruption. let's talk about inadequate planning. we are at risk now of wasting billions of dollars if the agencies charged with implementing new programs and constructing new facilities do not first answer some basic questions. now i have been in washington for 30 some years. i almost fell off the stage. [laughter] i came from ohio. and maybe i keep this midwestern approach to issues, the basic simple questions that you would ask if you are buying a house, buying a car or trying to lecture your daughter on what school to go to. simple questions, logical questions. these questions aren't being asked or i should say aren't being answered in afghanistan. questions such as are these programs and buildings needed? have you asked the afghans if they want them? have you coordinated with any of the other organizations working for either the u.s. government or the international community? have we designed them to meet any specific needs that the afghans have? and have we designed them in such a way that they can be sustainable in the future? quite often, we find the answ
and in and the hiring of future unauthorized workers and lastly, we established an improved process for admitting future workers to serve our nation's workforce needs while simultaneously protecting all workers. other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there is more political risk and opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. we believe we have a window of opportunity to act, but we will only succeed if the effort is bipartisan. by their presence today, my republican colleagues are making a significant statement about the need to fix our broken immigration system. we democrats are equally serious. we do not want immigration as a wedge issue. much rather, we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problems and becomes law. we recognize that in order to pass bipartisan legislation none of us can get everything we want. that is why our framework says we can address the people living here ille
government more effect days. lastly, act in a manner we are not ashamed of her children watching because they are. i'm taking these principles to heart and we party hit the ground running to create better jobs, better schools and a more effective government. a company recently came to montana and said goodbye to the kid a manufacturing facility in great falls, but they needed a workforce ready for the high-tech bidding they do. they are exactly the kind we should have here in montana. that's why we've been working with great boss college, training workers to fill these jobs in this company is now committed to moving to the electric city. [cheers and applause] now, as part of the new program, will also ensure that high schools in great falls can graduate with the certificates that would make them attractive candidates for this company as well. not only is it better jobs, the better education. i pledge to bring a more effective government to montana and we do not already as well. tomorrow for the first time after, montana's check book will be online. [applause] will have and still be impro
. >> and lastly, will the federal establishment be as sensitive to the economic issues? >> that's an important set of questions. i don't talk about the federal system as much because they're on the opposite trajectory. so the federal system, as was just mentioned, is actually expanding. the bureau of prisons budget actually expanded this past year. it is going kind of counter to the direction that states are going in, and the aclu sponsored a couple of hearings in congress where states leaders, from states that i do have enacted significant reform, presented the story of what had happened in their state and trying to kind of motivate reform in the federal system. the reality is that the economic pressures facing the states instead of governments don't exist in the same way as they do with the federal government. so the federal government isn't feeling that same bench. state governments have to balance their budgets. the federal government doesn't, and so there are few pressures on the federal government to actually have to deal with this as a cost-saving measure. the reality is as i think the stat
transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] lastly, it was abraham lincoln said that we must quote, care for him to who have borne the battle. in indiana, our veterans are hurt. and they need our help. believe it or not, post 9/11 veterans have an unemployment rate higher than the national average. we have to do better. we owe these heroes nothing less. he graduated in 2006, he decided to join the army in iraq and afghanistan for his first deployment in 2001. one night the convoy came under attack in a rocket propelled grenade push the copperplate through, basically destroying his left leg. nevertheless, he was able to hold a 250-pound door in place, saving the lives of likely everyone in the vehicle. he has had two dozen surgeries since and most recently was a year ago. last fall he got married and did his first 5k. big tim is an american hero. he is with us tonight. [applause] [applause] our budget makes clear commitment to hurt and jim hoosiers who served our union and certifying veterans service officers. i have also set a goal in our administration to prepare contracts f
their obligations and following the law and regulations and regulations that are established and lastly, the physical layout has to be revisited. there has to the maximum number of precincts that the location can only hold and to add on with that, you have to be prepared to increase the size of the staff and machines and processes and being able to scale up for the larger locations you might have so i think that is important and one of the areas we need to address, one size doesn't fit all. we don't look at one system for every location. we need to make sure we look at the size of the location as well as management of the precinctss within the location. thank you. >> one thing i would like you to consider in the closing statement is advice that you would give to other jurisdictions that find themselves in a battleground state. earlier today we heard there were ten states that were identified as meeting that criteria. for some like ohio, pennsylvania, cloud ground in many ways that there were some state foot for the first time found themselves under the scrutiny you referred to particula
't seen, charles alluded to this lastly, are the social dislocation talks of this. that is to say, when we started "the weekly standard" in 1995, the worst, very good piece, but would make you laugh if you would like to look at it was by a criminologist and sociologist was called here come the super predators. and the argument was that we had created a generation of 17-year-olds, youth, whose fathers had been in prison, never seen a strong family, none of that. and basically they were on the way to creating a crime wave the likes of which we had never seen. that is one of the great humbling moments of my life as an editor. wonderful piece, perfectly argued and it made absolute sense at the time that we published it. and it was so wildly wrong that it's not 18 years later. you know, we have now lived through a 20 year decline in crime. new york city last week, not one person was killed last week in new york city. that sounds like you should celebrate something like that. >> that's a big. >> john has been out of town. >> that's right. someone mispronounce my name and i was -- but it's a real
. lastly i want to remind everyone that there is an opportunity to submit comments for the record. you can submit materials or public comments to us in one of two ways, either by mail at the u.s. commission on civil rights, office of the general counsel here at 1331 and sylvania avenue northwest, suite 1150, washington, d.c. 204 to five. or you can send it via e-mail to public comments at usc c.r..gov. we look forward to preparing the report and -- that's right. u-lite emotion you wanted to make. >> [inaudible] >> we keep the record open for an additional 15 days, given the level of public interest in the topic spend rather than 30 days we would have 45? >> forty-five. >> we have unanimous consent? so you actually have members of the public 45 days from today to submit your public comments, and we do look forward to preparing and sending our report for finance recommendations from what we've learned here today to the president and congress. thank you, and we adjourned this hearing. [inaudible conversations] >> coming up in a few minutes we will take you to the brookings institution here in
. lastly, measure your time here
.c. challenge, i can't do that anymore. lastly, measure your time here not by the loud volume of the positions you take but by the service you give. learn the facts, stand up for what you think is right and fight hard. but remember, today's opponent is tomorrow's ally and nobody, not even coach snyder or coach self, wins every game. listen, learn, and lead so that we may move forward together towards a more prosperous, more just, more decent kansas. kansas is the heart of america. let's make our place a shining example for the nation to follow. it is within our reach to see that our children can read. it is within our reach to strengthen marriages and families. it is within our reach to reduce taxes. it is within our reach to lead in job growth and energy independence. it is within our reach to balance our budget and meet the needs of our people. our place, kansas, will show the path, the difficult path, for america to go in these troubled times. like kansas newspaper publisher william allen white once said, there is just one way to stop progress in america, and that is to hire some hungry ear
in the database. lastly, the u.s. census will be releasing later in the year data on how many people with disabilities actually voted. it will be broken down by category and types of disabilities and in the cases that the larger jurisdictions, there will even be data. there were 14,700,000 people with disabilities who voted in 2008. that is still a 7% cap between disabled and able-bodied voter participation. poll worker training is extremely important. some of the problems we saw in the selection, but previous elections that link back to poll worker training machines be turned off. the poll workers pressure people not to use the machine. poll workers quite an approach really looking at a person with a disability insane this happens over and over again. that is the legal. it is morally offensive and it happens lots of times in every election a month to places. i want to commend the district because they used testing after training for poll workers. i think that is essential and it's not just to teach with the poll worker knows, but to teach election officials book points the training
. third, poor security. fourth, questionable sustainability and lastly, corruption. talk about inadequate planning. we are. we are at a risk billions of dollars if the agencies charged with implementing new programs and can start two new facilities do not first answer some basic questions. i've been in washington for 37 years. how must sell at this stage. they came from ohio and keep this midwestern approach to issues come assertive basic simple questions that you would ask if you are buying a house, buying a car or train to lecture your daughter on what school to pick. set up a simple question from a logical question. these happening aren't being answered in afghanistan. questions such as, are these programs in buildings needed? have you asked the afghans if they want them? have you court made it but then at the other organizations working with the u.s. government or international community? have we designed them to meet any specific need that the afghans have? and have we designed them in such a way that they can be sustainable in the future? quite often we find the answers to these que
. lastly, director cordray, last night you made a call to bill cheney, talk to them about this. we really appreciate again. that call and the cooperation you've shown to us. as we try to work through all this. the last thing is, will this be published this afternoon, the final rule? [laughter] >> we are very hopeful it will be published this afternoon. >> heads are nodding. >> thank you. mary hunter. joe rogers? ed? >> good afternoon. it is indeed a pleasure to be here. my name is ed brown and am represent the maryland state naacp, and i would like to say on behalf of our membership, that the mortgage issue very adversely impacted our community. similar to congressman cummings, we had a number of workshops and hearings around the state, and i can't tell you how many stories i could relate to you about horror stories about people experience. so we appreciate his first that you are taking to make improvements in the status quo, but while the bright lights are shining and everybody is here, everything is well and good, but this is the first step. it's not a last step, and we are looking to i
." and he goes on to discuss it in various views. and he says, lastly, "it would fafacilitate and foster the painful practice of practices which has shown itself only be in states where a majority, a practice subversive of all the order and principles of regular government, a practice which leads more directly to public convulsions and the ruin of popular governments than any other which has yet been displayed among us." and he also made point that you would end up with equitable sacrifices to the general wheel or general good. so as we turn to our conversations in our respective caucuses and to the dialogue here on the floor of the senate, i ask my colleagues to search your hearts about our responsibility to the citizens of the united states of america to address the big issues facing america, which means that we don't paralyze this body in secret. if you have points to make then do them, as was done during periods of great debates on the floor of the senate, make them on the floor of the senate, engage in that debate. and when no more is to be said, when all hundred senators say, we ha
, came to are a bit edgy not done so, and her husband as well, others i think would have died. lastly, the woman who i believe stop the initial wounds and injuries and murdered, and that's -- i call her a hero. she said so-called hero. she's a woman of action because she grabbed that extended magazine and prevented the shooter from reloading. otherwise many more people would have died that day. i was a strong supporter of the second amendment. i believe as the chairman said we should not be about trying to take away guns at all from responsible gun owners, but we have to do something after what happened in tucson and all the other mass tragedies including of course the terrible tragedy in newtown. we have to do something. we have no right to be here unless we do something. i'm confident, try to undo your leadership we have not only seen but will continue to hear from so many diverse voices that inform the work we have to do here. we have heard from people who are in favor of change and people who are opposed to change, and all in between. so i appreciate the opportunity to hear from o
in somalia. somalia has a long way to go but the fact that president is on was hit lastly, that our secretary of state formally announced the recognition of that government, this is inconceivable just a few years ago. i think again that's where we are at our best. not necessarily leading, supporting, training, equipping, helping in ways that the africans ask us to help. that's what we do best. >> good afternoon. i am with the institute for policy studies, and just really want to applaud the center for hosting this event, bring us together the week of an incredible inauguration and celebration of martin luther king day, to be able to talk about foreign policy. so i thank you for your vision. commander hamm, there's so many areas as she spoke that i thought i want to quibble on and question. i guess at the core of it when you talk about the state department giving at the 9 billion the department of defense giving 500 million to africa, it seems a bit disingenuous. primarily because the state department covers funds for private military contractors, that many would think are covered by the depar
by the states. lastly the real id act represents over seeks to raise the motor vehicle agencies to a minimum standard. many states have decided to move beyond that standard while others have remained satisfied with the status quo. unfortunately, the goal of secure identity to be met all jurisdictions must purchase with a real id. despite says -- setbacks, have proved the an excellent vehicle to the goal. >> i'm happy to be here today. delaware is the state with the most experience with the federal real id act. we have a saying in delaware, it's good being first. and casing and cementing real id i'm not sure how the holes today. we are one of the 13 states that are considered compliant by dhs. we have been issuing federal real id documents since 2010. i just want to go for briefly of how we got where we were and what we've done as we're implementing the program. we have done it successfully in delaware. we are a small state. we did get federal funding to be able to do it and we started right away because we didn't want to do a big bang approach to implementing the act. so in 2007, we started
more effect it. and lastly, acted in a manner that were not ashamed of our children watching because they are. i'm taking this principles to heart. and we've already hit the ground running to create better jobs, better schools and more effect of government. a company recently came to montana and said goodbye to look in in a manufacturing city, but they needed a workforce ready for the high-tech betting they do. he's high-paying jobs are exactly the kind we should have here in montana. that's why we with great falls college. the begin training workers to fill these jobs in this company is now moving to the electric city. [applause] i think the program also ensure high schools in great falls can graduate with certificates that would make them attractive candidates for the company as well. so not only is it better job, the better education. at the tulsa to bring to market new government to montana and we do not already as well. tomorrow for the first time ever, montana's check book will be online. [applause] bubble has is a searchable database so anyone in siena or anyone across the wor
's computer and electronic products in san jose. and then lastly is how do we grow a supply of advanced engineers in the united states by greeting and network of manufacturing universities? we've done it with land grant starting in the 1860s. this is the challenge of this generation this century, this year. that's our final recommendation. so, we can get our act together in this country, and from our perspective at the metro program, because we see all this energy bubbling up in cities and metros and states. we can realize the full potential that advanced manufacturing moment, but we do need to make some -- we do need of some smart public policy, whether in this town, or in the laboratories of democracy and centers of innovation, our states, cities and metropolitan areas. so with that concept setting, let me start with clous klaus. what is fueling it and what's been holding back? >> i do think, to the very fact that we're sitting here and debating it, the whole fact that you gave us show the debate is in full swing, and it's good that it is in full swing because there's so many factors
this together today who contributed to this spectacular event. lastly want to remind everyone that there is an opportunity to submit comments for the record you can submit comments to us and one of two ways either by mail at the u.s. commission on civil rights office of the general counsel here at 1331 pennsylvania avenue nw washington, d.c. 20425. or you can send an e-mail, public comments at usccr.gov. we look forward to preparing the report. you have a motion that he wanted to make. >> [inaudible] not for the public understand the topic. we have 45 days from today to submit your public comments and then we look forward to preparing and sending our report with finding the recommendation about what we've learned here today. thank you. it's now 2:45 come and we adjourn this hearing. she had been talking about this dream that he had. she talked about it for years, the american dream come and then it had become his dream and he'd been in the trade just a few months before, and he talked about if i have a dream that america will someday realize these principles in the declaration
? and isn't the federal prisons growing out of more rapid -- >> yes. >> and lastly, will the federal establishment be as sensitive to the economic issues as the states are? >> yeah, no, that's an important set of questions. i don't talk about the federal system as much because they are on the opposite trajectory. so the federal system, as was just mentioned, is actually expanding. the bureau of prisons' budget actually expanded this past, this past year. it is going kind of countercounter to the that the states are going in. and the aclu recently sponsored a couple of hearings in congress where state leaders from states that actually have enacted significant reform presented the story of what had happened in their states and trying to kind of poet sate reform in the federal -- motivate reform in the federal system. the reality is that the economic pressures facing the states and state governments don't exist in the same way as they do with the federal government. so the federal government isn't feeling that same pinch. they -- state governments have to balance their budget. the feder
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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